My Visit With The Nutritionist

Since my recent endoscopy showed my celiac disease as being very active, my GI referred me to a nutritionist who specializes in celiac disease. I met with this woman the other day.

Studies show that each person with celiac disease has a different threshold for how much gluten he or she can tolerate without suffering a consequence. For some people it is as little as 10 mg a day while others can tolerate up to 100 mg a day. In either case it’s about 1/8 teaspoon of gluten.

We talked about cross-contamination at home. I assured her that mine was a gluten-free kitchen. She did show me a nifty little product called a toast it bag. Maybe you’ve already known about these bags but I didn’t. You can purchase these at https://www.amazon.com/ekSel-Stick-Reusable-Toaster-Bags/dp/B00LOXN6JO. This is a good option for home as well as for travelling. My husband is not celiac and he does eat regular bread. However, he never toasts his bread. But if he wanted to, I’ll have him put his bread in this toast it bag because my toaster is gluten free.

When at the deli ordering gluten-free cold cuts, ask that the deli slicer be cleaned before slicing your meat. Be careful with condiments or spread-type foods such as mayonnaise and peanut butter. Mark those jars with “GF” so no one making a sandwich using bread that contains gluten will dip into these jars with their knife. Use squeeze bottles whenever possible.

She reminded me that cross-contamination can occur at the food manufacturing facility, therefore, reading product labels is essential to find out if foods containing gluten are also made there. Food preparation at restaurants is also an issue. This is one reason why I don’t eat out very often. Fast-food places are strictly off limits for me. In restaurants, even if the chef tells you there are no ingredients containing gluten in your food,  you really don’t know how careful they are about preparing food using utensils or cooking pans where they also cook with gluten. Basically, even if a pizza place offers gluten-free pizza, they are still cooked on the same boards and placed in the same ovens as those containing gluten.

So you really shouldn’t eat anywhere unless it is strictly a gluten-free establishment. I don’t know of any in my area. Do you?

Until next time…